The dolphin bearing the weight of humankind’s trash

The left and right sides of Fanbelt’s dorsal fin, with the object wrapped around its entire body, cutting into the front of its dorsal fin and scraping its sides
Grace, another one of the resident humpback dolphins in Langkawi, pictured here with her young calf. She is another example of a dolphin with past traumatic injuries caused by human activity — almost all of her dorsal fin and the tips of her tail flukes are missing
Forgot your sunscreen? Not to worry! The ocean probably has it and so much more. Pictured here is the pile of trash we collected in the span of five minutes. NOTE: Please do not follow as in the picture, where our ex-intern Joel uses up some of the mystery product found in this bottle.
Picture credit: Carolyn Grant
Humpback dolphins in Langkawi swimming through areas with marine debris
Where does all our waste end up? If thrown away indiscriminately, it ends up in the sea and washed up on our coastlines. These are not photos from faraway lands; these photographs were captured on Malaysian shores. Left: Sedili, Johor; Right: Uninhabited beach near Teluk Apau, Langkawi
An emaciated dolphin with a chronic skin disease and multiple severe lesions all over its body sighted in the coastal waters of Matang, Perak
Gasha (left) and Kai (right), resident dolphins we see regularly in Langkawi. We know through our research that Gasha is a female, who despite her past injury, has successfully borne several offspring. Both animals are easily identified due to the large wounds on their bodies
Fanbelt was resighted in late 2019, free of the foreign object that was stuck on its body. With the fan belt gone, now what’s left behind is a severely disfigured dorsal fin and scars on its sides
Reusable versions of single-use plastic items can be easily found now! Why not try to put together your very own to-go reusable kit today?
The MareCet team and some volunteers out on a survey along the coast of Perlis

MareCet is an NGO dedicated to the research and conservation of marine mammals and their habitats in Malaysia.

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Flukes for Thought by MareCet

Flukes for Thought by MareCet

MareCet is an NGO dedicated to the research and conservation of marine mammals and their habitats in Malaysia.

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